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Memoir Writing in Fairfax

This page features a creative writing piece submitted by participants of the Adult Services Department's Memoir Writing Group in Fairfax. Stories and opinions of individuals are not necessarily those of the Pozez Jewish Community Center of Northern Virginia.

For more information, contact Shari.Berman@theJ.org


Poems

"Almost There" by Jane Rosenthal, March, 2021

Are we almost there?

Days of waiting for the promised vaccine

Months of counting losses

Vanishing like smoke into the clouds

Yet not quite finished this silent threat

Of rebound

Yes, the balls in our court to mask or not

To keep away from those we love

Lines upon lines

Staggering to the finish

Seating in chairs with rolled up sleeves

A faint prick

And now the wait

Watching for the signs

A rash, a fever, chills and aches

Banished for now

Making room for lost hugs

Almost there!

 

"Memories of Snow" by Jane Rosenthal, February 2021

Dripping down like tears falling gently to the earth

Clinging to the branches in clusters

Replenishing life-giving water

Covering the leaves like a canopy of white

Waiting for the sun to nurture unborn life

Children playing in the street

Fashioning snowballs with sticks and stones

Weaving a path towards home

Cheeks rosy from the cold

Shaking droplets from boots and hats

Sipping steaming cups of hot chocolate

Curling up with books and blankets

Dreaming of tomorrow

 

"Moments" by Jane Rosenthal, January 2021

Shadows and light

Exposing the truth buried beneath the headlines

Lives disrupted, icons smashed

Freedom and justice restored

The Statue of Liberty burns brightly

A shot in the arm promising deliverance

Hopes and dreams ignited

An unbreakable bond between

We the people and elected leaders

Trust renewed

The scourge scraped clean

The Capitol prevails

Oaths honored

 

"Go Away Coronavirus!" by Eda R. Pickholtz, Fairfax, VA, March 27, 2020

A virus suddenly appeared from the East 

Causing death and destruction in each country it reached

It started in China, and before anyone knew

Spread to Korea, Spain, and Italy too

It was then called a pandemic, how quickly it spread

First hit old people, then all people, left many dead

No country was prepared for the necessary tasks

Shortages of everything, such as surgical masks

Not enough doctors, nurses and hospitals too

People are worried how we'll ever get through 

We need more gowns, rubber gloves, and kits for testing 

Ventilators, hand sanitizers, and beds for resting

We're short of so much, no country prepared

From young to the old, leaving everyone scared

A wise man appeared, Dr. Fauci, in the U.S.

He tells us the science behind this virus

What we must do to make this plague leave

 

The restrictions are strict and daily we grieve

No hugging or kissing or any contact

"If you get too close, I'll have to fight back"

 

"Social distancing" it's called, "Stay away six feet

Otherwise this virus will never be beat"

People were told to scrub their hands

Twenty seconds or more is the demand

Sanitizers were used to scrub down the house

"Don't touch your face, eyes, nose or mouth"

Walking outside is always permitted

However remember to keep your distance

Companies converted to help win this race

To make surgical masks at a great pace

Stores closed around us, no restaurants, no bars

No libraries or gyms, or even the parks

Schools had to close, kids had to study

Only with family, never a buddy

Thank goodness the food stores were open, to help

However, many necessities flew off the shelves

No wipies, towels, no toilet paper

"Come back again, we'll stock up later"

No airlines will fly, no sports to play

Everything's closed down, even Broadway

Have you ever heard of Disney Parks closed?

And movie houses to add to our woes

The only things left to help us feel free

Are texting, phone calling, and watching T.V.

We don't know how this darn thing will end

Meanwhile our neighbors become our friends.

 

"Zoom in 2020" by Eda R. Pickholtz, Fairfax, VA, April 16, 2020

We all should be happy with Zoom

We're no longer alone in a room

We could learn with just one

Or one hundred and one

To help beat this pandemic gloom

 

We all should be happy with Zoom

We're no longer alone in a room

Your family's suddenly there

With virtual cocktails to share

To help beat this pandemic gloom
                      

We all should appreciate Zoom

We're no longer alone in a room

You can wear your old clothes

Because nobody knows

To help beat this pandemic gloom

 

"Lift Up Your Feet and Dance" by Eda R. Pickholtz, Fairfax, VA, May 2, 2020

When the world is filled with doom

You want to shake this virus gloom

Make some space within a room

Just lift up your feet and dance

 

Use some music with a quick beat

Jazz and mambo would be neat

Do what you can to beat defeat

Just lift up your feet and dance

 

2020 is our virus year 

Your friends and family need some cheer

We want the virus to disappear

Meanwhile lift your feet and dance.

 

"Wash, Rinse, and Repeat" by Joshua Greene, November 15, 2020

Thanks to the virus Covid-19

The days have a sameness, or so it seems.

Rise early, read papers, stretch, and wash,

Then feed the cat and have a quick nosh

After which comes walk number 1:

Forty-five minutes at not quite a run.

 

After the walk it’s time to eat:

Citrus and yogurt, with bread that’s whole wheat,

Some veggies and fruit; must limit the sweets.

Then it’s off to check e-mail or some work to do

After which lunch, and then walk number 2.

Once back from the walk I can finally read

Although chores or activities may intercede.

 

Do economics or play the piano,

Read a textbook or watch a video.

If drowsiness comes, take a short forty winks

Then back to reading, perhaps with a drink.

If hunger arises, there’s time for a snack

To be followed by walking to the next cul-de-sac.

Then back to reading, or writing, or working online

Beware of Facebook, which can take too much time.

 

When dinner time comes, we can choose what to eat:

Fish or chicken or beef, all to reheat

Accompanied by vegetables and some more bread

With blessings before and afterward said.

Another walk follows, and then back inside,

Watch a play or a concert, call friends, or just hide.

 

By 9:30 or 10, with eyes getting droopy,

It’s time for bed, before becoming loopy.

Turn off the computer, brush teeth and take pills,

Then under the covers and ward off the chills.

 

Though the days have a pattern, some are unique:

With activities the schedule will tweak.

On Mondays, up early, to the cleaners before 9,

To collect things the same day, all ironed quite fine.

Monday evening is trash time, so search far and wide:

Empty baskets and cat litter, then put trash cans outside.

Wednesday evenings a ZOOM call, 6:30 to near 8,

For the Singapore minyan – which we hope won’t run late.

On Fridays, a mad rush to prepare for Shabbos,

Sheets and towels must be washed

Before maids clean and polish.

Friday night we light candles, have kiddush and challah,

Eat dinner, chant birkat, brush teeth, and read parashah.

Saturday, I rise early to walk and eat quickly

Before services on ZOOM, a short chat, and ha-motzi.

The rest of the day is at leisure: walk, read, and have dinner

Then ZOOM once more for Havdalah – just five minutes, a winner.

 

And throughout it all, I’m blessed with my wife

In the house, for company and to sweeten life.

As a pair we go shopping, run errands, and talk,

Watch TV (she more than I) and perhaps jointly walk.

With our son living nearby, working late or at home,

And a daughter and son-in-law we can contact by phone

We feel lucky indeed. We wish others the same:

A life full of meaning and health, free from pain.

 

"Masks" by Jane Rosenthal, Springfield, VA, November 15, 2020

What’s underneath the mask?

Dare I ask, and hope

To find eyes that reflect the soul.

 

Eyes that are a window

Letting in the light of reason

Probing our assumptions

Grappling with hard truths.

 

The barriers we create are man and woman made

The masks we hide behind obscure our true intentions

 

Do we wear them to protect our community,

Our friends and relatives

Or do we fear the scourge we ourselves unleash

 

"The Promise of Hope" by Jane Rosenthal, Springfield, VA

The promise of hope springs eternal

Spirits rising

Spreading peace and justice

Sharing the fruits of the earth.

A better world

One day together

Striving for the light

Preventing despair, sickness and famine

One planet waking up

We are all in this together

All connected

Through our dreams

Facing the future

Memoir Writing

"Exercising One's Right to Vote" by Ila Good, February 2021

In November 2020 we Americans turned out in record numbers to make our vote count.  In many of our minds, including my own, our commitment to democracy was being challenged as never before in our lifetimes.  We could not be indifferent about casting our vote; this time, it mattered, and we owed it not only to ourselves but to our children and grandchildren.  And so, we showed up in every state, in every precinct, in every district, all across America to make our voices heard.  As I watched this renewed commitment throughout the country to exercise one’s right to vote in 2020, I was transported back in time nearly 70 years, to India’s very first nation-wide election in 1951.  Like 2020 in America, there was at that time in India a palpable sense of purposeful engagement in this most basic ritual of democracy.  I remembered the electrifying energy that drove millions of Indians to the polls in 1951 as citizens of a newly independent democratic republic, at the same time as I witnessed the energy that propelled the voter turnout in America in 2020. 

I was too young to vote in that unforgettable 1951 Indian election although I can clearly remember the euphoria and pride each Indian felt.  My family and I shared in the celebratory mood that swept the entire country, after a hard-fought independence movement against British rule.  For me it was intensely personal as my parents and grandparents and other members of my extended family had actively participated in nationwide protests against the British.  My grandfather went to jail for joining Gandhi’s call to defy the British through acts of civil disobedience.  My parents joined the boycott of factory-made British textiles by spinning “khadi” or self-made hand-woven cloth produced on a simple portable wheel – a symbolic ritual that became a daily fixture in my home, as it did across India.  For a wide-eyed child like myself, it was a heady experience to march alongside my parents and join local throngs in singing patriotic songs, or to sit packed closely against my mother at massive gatherings to hear Gandhi and other national leaders invoke the people to remain steadfast and united in their quest for independence.  My siblings and I listened intently to calls by these charismatic leaders to protest peacefully, insisting that the British “Quit India.” 

Despite Gandhi’s calls for unity, however, we also found ourselves enveloped in a horrific trauma of events unleashed by the impending British decision to partition India into two nations along religious lines.  Calcutta, my city, had always been known for its harmonious blending of diverse religions, but as independence approached, it was caught up in the worst possible madness and violence – killing thousands, and forcing Hindus and Muslims out of their once peaceful neighborhoods to seek safe-havens among their co-religionists.  Alongside my memories of the inspiring moments of the independence movement, are recollections of that monumental tragedy in India’s history that became personal as my parents opened our home to Hindu “refugees” who were secretly spirited out of their endangered neighborhoods by my uncle and his team of brave young volunteers, accomplished at the risk of their own lives.  I remember shivering as I stood on our rooftop and watched smoke arising out of distant neighborhoods where fires raged and I heard the muffled cries of militants vowing revenge and death on one community or the other.  My child’s sense of security was further shaken a few months later by the news of Gandhi’s assassination -- not only because it was a national tragedy of epic proportion, but because Gandhi’s death was a personal loss for both my parents but particularly for my mother who had known him for decades as a father figure, especially after the loss of her own father in South Africa.

Gandhi’s death took place in January 1948, but in August 1947, we celebrated India’s independence.  My parents marked this historic occasion by sending my two older sisters (I was too young to make the trip) to New Delhi to witness first-hand the ceremony and celebration – a testament to my parents’ wish that their children fully embrace the occasion.  Four years later, India laid another cornerstone in its democracy by holding its first ever free election in 1951.  I was not old enough to vote, but I vividly recall my parents and all our neighbors and friends turning out to cast their votes as if it were a sacred duty.  Young and old, rich and poor, male and female – all across India people went to the polls- 173 million of them.  To a person, each one of them understood that this simple act was what democracy and freedom was all about.  I remember how proud people were to show off the indelible black ink stamped on their thumb to prove they had voted.  

 As I voted yet again as an American citizen in my local Virginia precinct this past November, memories of the 1951 Indian election washed over me. Today, I am equally proud of having exercised the power of my own vote to affirm my own commitment to democracy in the 2020 election, right here in America, as I was to watch my fellow Indian citizens do the same thing all those 70 years ago. 

"Inspiration" by Jane Rosenthal, February 2021

I looked forward with some trepidation to moving from Miami, Florida to Springfield, VA when the transfer notice from the Air Force came through for my husband.

After enrolling our two sons in new schools, I spent the first few weeks until our rental house was ready, encamped at the Chesapeake Bagel Factory at an outdoor table with our border collie Sam, in tow.

Once we moved in I began to think about finding a job and scanned the job opportunities in the local paper. I felt overqualified for many of the entry level jobs and underqualified for the ones that asked for several years of experience. In desperation I contacted the editorial staff at the regional Connection newspapers who liked my journalism background but could not meet my salary requirements for a feature editor.

Then I had an idea. I offered to do a feature story and said that if they accepted it, he could pay me as an independent freelancer while I continued my job search. The editor asked me to interview Dr. Jan Northrup, an educator who had just designed a program for working women and published a book titled ”The Promotable Woman, What Makes a Difference.”

During the interview she suggested I attend the seminars for federal women to get a better understanding of her program, and this assignment changed my life in ways I could never imagine. I learned that the ability to communicate with people from the mailroom to the executive offices was the key to success and career advancement. As the weeks went by, I became more confident, energized and focused on developing these essential skills.

When the article was published Dr. Northrup was extremely pleased and suggested I contact her public relations firm in Washington, DC to apply for a job as an account executive. She set up the interview, arranged for me to meet the vice president, and before I knew it, I began working for Clews Communications, The president let me know that Dr. Northrup wanted me assigned to her account so she could finish the book she was writing and promote her advice for working women in syndicated columns.

We met over coffee where I came equipped with tape recorder, pens and notebook.  I asked her how she would handle different situations that working women encountered, such as: What do you do when you’re stuck in traffic? How do you balance a career with raising a family? How do you advance your career?

These were questions I knew would arise for myself and for women reentering the workplace and seeking promotions. “What do you do when you are stuck in traffic on a highway and the driver in the car next to you gets frustrated and honks his horn?” I asked.  She replied: “Imagine the driver in the other car is wearing purple polka-dot shorts!”

I incorporated her advice in applying for my next job as a personnel consultant where I worked for 21 years and shared the advice she had given me with all my clients. I encouraged them to imagine each job as a building block that would give them a foundation to build their skills, and to treat each person with dignity and respect from the receptionist to the C-Suite executives.

"American Home Products Corporation by Joan DaSilva, February 2021

When I was twenty-five, I got a job with American Home Products Corporation in their pharmaceutical advertising department on Third Avenue in Manhattan.

 When I came for the interview Olivia came to greet me. She was extremely beautiful and had an other- worldly air like mad Ophelia in Hamlet. We conversed briefly and she handed me a sheet of paper whose text consisted of one long paragraph almost the length of the page. She said she wanted me to make all the necessary corrections, then she left the room and closed the door.

To my relief I saw that the text contained no mathematics, only descriptions of chemical terms, many of which had errors. I completed the test and handed the paper to Olivia.  She asked me to wait and disappeared for about fifteen minutes. When she returned she glowed with pleasure. She said she will give me the job because I was the only one who got a perfect score.

We arranged the date when I would begin my work. I then went back to the employment agency and told them I was offered the job.  “I am surprised they hired a Jew” commented the lady at the desk.

When I showed up at work the following week, I was given a nicely furnished office on a par with all the others.  Apparently, they hadn’t planned properly because within two weeks they hired another woman who had to share my office because no other was available.

Ann and I got along really well. She was close to forty and a pharmacist. She had a glamorous background of once having been employed by Hollywood studios and starring in a couple of films. She was slender and curvaceous and very quickly made friends with an older gentleman whose office was across from ours. She would visit him occasionally, sitting on his desk, drinking her morning coffee and dangling her beautiful legs.

Ann was an alcoholic. I didn’t know about things like that then. I admired her easy smile and casual relaxed manner. She carried a flask of Hennessey Cognac in her bag. The flask was in a beige suede pouch. I bought myself a flask and pouch just like that and filled it with Hennessey Cognac. To accompany Ann, I would take a small sip. I didn’t like it and it did nothing to me since I swallowed only a few drops. But we enjoyed the camaraderie.

During the time I shared the office with Ann, they began constructing an office for me in the main entryway next to Olivia. They built it against an interior wall with three sides, a door and no window. I had a nice desk, a good armchair and lots of light.

I had been in my new office a few weeks when I found out that Ann had left suddenly for health reasons.

Shortly after Ann left, her office had a new occupant. Sue was a lesbian. She had a mannish appearance due to her haircut, manner of dress and conversation. Olivia requested I introduce myself and explain the work I was doing.

I was curious and confused about Sue. I tried to discern just how much of her was a man and how much a woman. I came to the conclusion that perhaps she was a man in a woman’s body. Since I always reacted to men differently because of their physical state, I concluded that now I could only react to the masculine spirit within her.

The advertisements were presented to me on cardboards called mechanicals. I also received the copy version. I checked for all possible errors then took them to Olivia for approval and signature. She was always gracious, and I had the feeling when I entered her office that I was being ushered in for tea.

Olivia used to tell me about her mother with whom she lived, but only in generalities. Often her eyes would mist over. She wore no makeup and her brown hair hung down to her shoulders like that of a small girl. She was tall and straight and had perfect, classic features marred only by what appeared to be cold sores on her lips. She applied some kind of shiny ointment to them but in the two years that I knew her I never saw them disappear.

Gigi was the director of the office. She was of French extraction, a diminutive, elegant woman in her fifties. Olivia would always refer to her in exalted terms. Whenever she mentioned Gigi her voice would take on a warm reverential tone.

When I brought her my mechanicals there was always time for Olivia to disclose some closely held feelings.

“They refer to me as The Company Girl, but that’s alright, I don’t mind in the least, I always do my best and follow Gigi’s wishes” she said.

When Olivia found me silent her favorite expression was “A penny for your thoughts, I’m no miser.” Then she would smile broadly, showing her nice set of teeth.

Olivia worked in a business office but in her company, one was in a milieu of good manners, dedication to the company and loyalty to Gigi. These things were imperative in maintaining a solidarity in work and office life. There was after all not just the advertising, there were issues of morality and human ties. And Olivia wove that web and lived in it.

I was having a problem. The work was easy and after a few weeks boring. But my problem was that I had trouble getting past the words. I managed to struggle through the first year I was there. In the second year Olivia hired an assistant for me.

Betty had a desk between Olivia’s office and mine. She was about three years my junior, very pleasant and bright. I began to have a lot more trouble getting past the words. I would look at the word but wasn’t sure I was seeing it correctly. I had to force myself to finish the sentence. After I finished the sentence, I worried about it. Did I miss something?

I was having similar problems at home. I had difficulty leaving the house because I couldn’t be certain I had locked the door. After turning the key in the lock, I would test the handle. Yes, the door was locked. But after I let go of the handle, I wasn’t sure the door was locked. The more often I tested the handle the more difficult it was to walk away. So, I would force myself to test the handle only once or twice and then walk away quickly.

The same thing happened when I checked to make sure the knobs on the stove were in the OFF position. The longer I stared at them the more difficult it was to walk away.  I talked to myself a lot. I said that I would look at the knob and then not look at it again. Then I would walk away. If nothing happened and there was no fire or explosion, then I would know that it was safe to look at the knob once and move away.

All this took a lot of energy and by the time I completed these tasks I was perspiring from tension.

It was at the end of the second year that I had a panic attack.

At lunchtime I took the elevator downstairs and went outside. It was a warm, sunny day and I stopped by the bank window and made a deposit. Then I took the elevator back upstairs. I was going to eat my sandwich which I always brought from home.

There were three tall young men in the elevator with me. I kept remembering blondish hair and a light brown jacket. I was shaking. I exited on my floor, opened the door to the entryway into the office suites and then unlocked my office door. I locked the door and stood against it with my back. My heart was pounding, and I was sweating.

I knew I could not continue working there. I was very embarrassed by my lack of efficiency and by the fact that Betty was needed to make the work move. Olivia was bending over backwards to help me but it only filled me with guilt and shame. One day Olivia approached me as I was passing her office. She looked very distraught. She was speaking almost in a whisper “you must make the work move along more quickly.” She was gentle and it was difficult for her to say that. I nodded in agreement and we parted.

The next day I told Olivia that I was resigning because I needed a rest. She didn’t say anything, but I knew she was shocked and offended. When she passed me in the hallway her eyes were red and her gesture abrupt and angry.

I left the next day. When the elevator stopped in the lobby I rushed out of the building. I knew I had money in my account at the bank, but I was too distraught to get it. “Some other time” I said to myself as I walked hurriedly to the subway station.

Joshua Greene: Memoir
"Music at Reform Congregation Beth Or in the Early 1960s"

Music at Reform Congregation Beth Or in the Early 1960s

Those who have never attended a Reform Jewish service, or who have only done so in recent years, have little idea of what American Reform services were like during the 1950s or 1960s. Services were stately, even decorous, with a rabbi, organ, and solo and responsive readings in English interspersed with Hebrew prayers, many of which were sung and marked for the Choir. Dress at services was formal, with men in suits and women in fancy dresses. Men prayed with uncovered heads and without talitot, while women wore hats, with many sporting large, elaborate creations that commanded attention. Some of my fondest memories were of women at our synagogue reading dramatically from the bimah, dressed impeccably and wearing broad-brimmed hats that added to the dignity of the occasion. I especially recall hearing them recite the Haftarah for Yom Kippur morning as if at a stage performance, intoning “Is this the fast that I have chosen?” to an awe-struck congregation hanging on every word.

Before the 1970s, few Reform synagogues had cantors. However, music was an essential part of services, and most synagogues had choirs, often with soloists, some of them paid professionals. At Beth Or in the 1960s, the choir sat in a prominent location at the front of the sanctuary, on the right, facing the organ. An adult choir, whose members wore black robes, served during evening and High Holiday services, while a children’s choir dressed in suits and dresses sang during Shabbat morning services. An adult member might join the organist and a few children to provide music during daytime services for Sukkot or Pesach on weekdays. A larger choir would sing during Shavuot, when confirmation ceremonies generally meant a large attendance. Later in the 1960s, the synagogue hired professional singers, and I remember hearing one of them rehearse during the afternoons when I occasionally stopped at the synagogue after school. I recall one moment during the Kedushah section of the Amidah when the soloist, to begin singing at a loud volume, would turn beet red before exploding with sound. Many years later the liberal congregation in Singapore with which my wife and I were affiliated used the same music at High Holiday services, and I shared the story with the visiting cantor, to our mutual laughter. 

For several years I served in the children’s choir, attending rehearsals one night a week and singing Saturday mornings. About a dozen of us, generally below bar or bat mitzvah age, would gather each week to rehearse and then reconvene Shabbat morning in our good clothes to sing at services. While we occasionally horsed around, we usually quieted down enough to practice and then perform well Saturday mornings. At the time, the Reform movement’s Union Prayer Book I, for Shabbat, Festivals, and Weekdays, had different texts and music for each week of the month. My favorite services were the first in the month, which were longer, especially if we included Hallel – psalms of praise – in honor of Rosh Chodesh, the new moon. Then we sang a pretty version of “Hodu L’Adashem” – very Romantic and totally different from the more traditional settings my friends at their Conservative synagogues would hear. I also liked our version of “Mah Tovu”, in which the words “Anei-ni be’emet” (“Answer me in truth”) were sung to a melody that sounded very much like “I wish you a Merry Christmas.” I still have my loose-leaf book from choir with music we used for services.

A special privilege of being in the children’s choir was the opportunity to serve as a soloist a few times a year, which provided the chance to sing several special passages. Among my favorites was chanting the “Y’verechecha” (the Priestly Blessing) at the end of the service, after the rabbi pronounced it with raised arms over the congregation’s bowed heads. Another was chanting Kiddush. Just before the “Y’verechecha” the soloist sang the solo parts of the Kiddush, with the choir and congregation joining in “Ki vanu ve-charta”, supported by a swelling organ. After chanting the Kiddush, the soloist got to drink some of the wine, and I remember once the rabbi at that time tapping me on the shoulder and announcing, “You don’t have to drink the whole thing,” to everyone’s laughter.

After I left college and graduate school and became involved in Washington D.C.’s Fabrangen chavurah in the late 1970s, I became more familiar with the combination of traditional Ashkenazic settings and modern folk music that were typical of chavurot and other informal congregations of the time. Music at Reform synagogues, in turn, changed by introducing both more traditional melodies and new, folk-rock settings, often performed by rabbis and cantors strumming guitars. While all this is fun, particularly for younger attendees, it would be fun to re-experience the synagogue music of my childhood, at least on occasion.

Joshua Greene Bio:

Dr. Joshua Greene is a macroeconomist with a specialization in public finance. Retired from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), where he served for more than 28 years, including 6 years as Deputy Director of the IMF-Singapore Regional Training Institute in Singapore, he is currently a Visiting Professor and Interim Director of the Applied Economics Track in the Master of Science in Economics program at Singapore Management University in Singapore.

He is also a consultant for the Asian Development Bank and has served periodically as a consultant for the IMF, the ASEAN+3 Macroeconomic Research Office (AMRO), and Bank Negara Malaysia (Malaysia’s central bank). He has also taught macroeconomics at George Mason University. Dr. Greene has done research on a variety of subjects, including African debt, factors affecting private investment in developing countries, the U.S. balance of payments, public debt issues facing the United States, and ways of accelerating growth in the United States.

He is the author of two books: Public Finance: An International Perspective, and Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy: A Systematic Approach, both published by World Scientific. His research has been published in IMF Staff Papers, World Development, the Journal of African Finance and Economic Development, and other journals. A past president of the Society of Government Economists, he has a Ph.D. in economics and a law degree from the University of Michigan and an undergraduate degree from Princeton University. Dr. Greene is also active at the Pozez JCC, having served as a Board member, past vice-president, and treasurer, and on the Film Festival Committee, which he co-chaired during 2011-12. 


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